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American Revolution

The Declaration of Independence

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The thirteen colonies in the America's had been at war with Britain for around a year when the Second Continental Congress decided it was time for the colonies to officially declare their independence. This meant that they were breaking away from British rule. They would no longer be a part of the British Empire and would fight for their freedom.

Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?

On June 11, 1776 the Continental Congress appointed five leaders, called the Committee of Five, to write a document explaining why they were declaring their independence. The five members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert Livingston, Roger Sherman, and Thomas Jefferson. The members decided that Thomas Jefferson should write the first draft.

Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft over the next few weeks and, after some changes made by the rest of the committee, they presented it to Congress on June 28, 1776.

Did everyone agree?

Not everyone agreed at first on declaring independence. Some wanted to wait until the colonies had secured stronger alliances with foreign countries. In the first round of voting South Carolina and Pennsylvania voted "no" while New York and Delaware chose not to vote. The Congress wanted the vote to be unanimous, so they continued to discuss the issues. The next day, July 2nd, South Carolina and Pennsylvania reversed their votes. Delaware decided to vote "yes" as well. This meant that the agreement to declare independence passed with 12 yes votes and 1 abstention (meaning New York chose not to vote).

July 4, 1776

On July 4, 1776 the Congress officially adopted the final version of the Declaration of Independence. This day is still celebrated in the United States as Independence Day.


Declaration of Independence - Click for larger view


After the signing, the document was sent to a printer to make copies. Copies were sent to all the colonies where the declaration was read aloud in public and published in newspapers. A copy was also sent to the British government.

Famous Words

The Declaration of Independence did more than just say the colonies wanted their freedom. It explained why they wanted their freedom. It listed all the bad things that the king had done to the colonies and that the colonies had rights which they felt they should fight for.

Perhaps one of the most famous statements in the history of the United States is in the Declaration of Independence:

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

Look here to read the full Declaration of Independence.

Look here for a list of who signed the Declaration of Independence.

Fun Facts about the Declaration of Independence

Take a ten question quiz at the Declaration of Independence questions page.



Revolutionary War Events
Timeline of the American Revolution
Stamp Act
Boston Massacre
Boston Tea Party
The Continental Congress
Declaration of Independence
The United States Flag
Valley Forge
The Treaty of Paris

Battles
Battles of Lexington and Concord
The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga
Battle of Bunker Hill
Washington Crossing the Delaware
The Battle of Saratoga
Battle of Yorktown

People
Abigail Adams
John Adams
Samuel Adams
Benedict Arnold
Ben Franklin
Patrick Henry
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Paine
Paul Revere
George Washington

Other
Daily Life
Revolutionary War Soldiers
Revolutionary War Uniforms
Patriots and Loyalists
Glossary and Terms

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