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American Revolution

Soldiers Uniforms and Gear

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Why do soldiers wear uniforms?

Uniforms are important in battle so soldiers know who is on their side. You don't want to shoot your own people. During the Revolutionary War the main weapon was the musket. When muskets are fired they give off a cloud of white smoke. During a large battle, the entire battlefield would soon be covered in white smoke. For this reason, many armies at the time liked to wear bright colors so they could tell their enemies from their friends.

Uniforms are also a way of telling the ranks of the soldiers. By the stripes, badges, and piping on coats as well as the style of hats, soldiers could tell the rank of the officer and would know who was in charge.

American Uniforms

The first American soldiers were local militia. Many of them weren't trained soldiers and they didn't have uniforms. Most of them wore whatever clothes they had. In 1775 the Congress adopted brown as the official color for the uniforms. However, many soldiers didn't have brown coats to wear because there was a shortage of brown material. Soldiers within the same regiment tried to wear the same color. In addition to brown, blue and gray were popular colors.


American Soldiers in a variety of uniforms

A typical uniform for an American soldier included a wool coat with a collar and cuffs, a hat that was generally turned up on the side, a cotton or linen shirt, a vest, breeches, and leather shoes.

British Uniforms

The British soldiers were often called the "Red Coats" because of their bright red coats. Although they are most famous for their red uniforms, they sometimes wore blue uniforms during the Revolutionary War.


British Uniforms

The British had very specific uniforms. Different types of soldiers had different styles of hats. The colors of their flaps showed which regiment they were part of. For example, dark green facings meant the soldier was a member of the 63rd regiment.

The Musket

The most important weapon for the Revolutionary War soldier was the musket. A good soldier could load and fire his musket around three times per minute. Muskets were smooth bore weapons that fired lead balls. They were not very accurate, so regiments of soldiers would fire at the same time in a "volley" in an effort to cover a wide area.

The most famous musket at the time was the "Brown Bess" used by the British. Many American soldiers had a Brown Bess musket that had been stolen or captured from the British.

Once the enemy came within close range, soldiers would fight with a sharp blade attached to the end of the musket called a bayonet.

Other Gear

Other gear carried by soldiers included a haversack or knapsack (like a backpack) that held food, clothing, and a blanket; a cartridge box that held extra ammunition; and a canteen filled with water.

Interesting Facts About the Soldiers Uniforms and Gear

Take a ten question quiz at the Soldiers Uniforms and Gear questions page.



Revolutionary War Events
Timeline of the American Revolution
Stamp Act
Boston Massacre
Boston Tea Party
The Continental Congress
Declaration of Independence
The United States Flag
Valley Forge
The Treaty of Paris

Battles
Battles of Lexington and Concord
The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga
Battle of Bunker Hill
Washington Crossing the Delaware
The Battle of Saratoga
Battle of Yorktown

People
Abigail Adams
John Adams
Samuel Adams
Benedict Arnold
Ben Franklin
Patrick Henry
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Paine
Paul Revere
George Washington

Other
Daily Life
Revolutionary War Soldiers
Revolutionary War Uniforms
Patriots and Loyalists
Glossary and Terms

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