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Ancient Greece

Decline and Fall

History >> Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was one of the dominant civilizations in the Mediterranean and the world for hundreds of years. Like all civilizations, however, Ancient Greece eventually fell into decline and was conquered by the Romans, a new and rising world power.

Alexander the Great

Years of internal wars weakened the once powerful Greek city-states of Sparta, Athens, Thebes, and Corinth. Philip II of Macedon (northern Greece) rose to power and, in 338 BC, he rode south and conquered the cities of Thebes and Athens, uniting most of Greece under his rule.

Upon Philip II's death, his son, Alexander the Great, took control. Alexander was a great general. He proceeded to conquer all of the lands between Greece and India including Egypt.

Greece Divided

When Alexander the Great died, there was a huge gap in power. Alexander's empire was divided among his generals. These new divisions soon began fighting. Although the Greek culture had spread throughout much of the world, it was politically divided.

Hellenistic Greece

The period of Ancient Greece after Alexander the Great is called Hellenistic Greece. During this time, the city-states of Greece fell into decline. The real centers of Greek culture moved to other areas in the world including the cities of Alexandria (Egypt), Antioch (Turkey), and Ephesus (Turkey).

The Rise of Rome

While the Greeks were in decline, a new civilization in Italy (the Romans) rose to power. As Rome grew more powerful, the Greeks started to see Rome as a threat. In 215 BC, parts of Greece allied with Carthage against Rome. Rome declared war on Macedonia (northern Greece). They defeated Macedonia at the Battle of Cynoscephalae in 197 BC and then again at the Battle of Pydna in 168 BC.

Battle of Corinth

Rome continued its conquest of Greece. The Greeks were finally defeated at the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC. Rome completely destroyed and plundered the city of Corinth as an example to other Greek cities. From this point on Greece was ruled by Rome. Despite being ruled by Rome, much of the Greek culture remained the same and had a heavy influence on Roman culture.

Primary Causes

There were many factors that went into the decline and fall of Ancient Greece. Here are some of the primary causes: Interesting Facts About the Decline and Fall of Ancient Greece Take a ten question quiz about this page.

For more about Ancient Greece:

Overview
Timeline of Ancient Greece
Geography
The City of Athens
Sparta
Minoans and Mycenaeans
Greek City-states
Peloponnesian War
Persian Wars
Decline and Fall
Legacy of Ancient Greece
Glossary and Terms

Arts and Culture
Ancient Greek Art
Drama and Theater
Architecture
Olympic Games
Government of Ancient Greece
Greek Alphabet

Daily Life
Daily Lives of the Ancient Greeks
Typical Greek Town
Food
Clothing
Women in Greece
Science and Technology
Soldiers and War
Slaves

People
Alexander the Great
Archimedes
Aristotle
Pericles
Plato
Socrates
25 Famous Greek People
Greek Philosophers

Greek Mythology
Greek Gods and Mythology
Hercules
Achilles
Monsters of Greek Mythology
The Titans
The Iliad
The Odyssey

The Olympian Gods
Zeus
Hera
Poseidon
Apollo
Artemis
Hermes
Athena
Ares
Aphrodite
Hephaestus
Demeter
Hestia
Dionysus
Hades

Works Cited

History >> Ancient Greece






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