Search


More polls
New from Ducksters

eBooks!

Read our content on your eReader or mobile device with no ads.
Science >> Chemistry for Kids >> Periodic Table
<---Scandium       Vanadium--->

Elements for Kids

Titanium

The element titanium

  • Symbol: Ti
  • Atomic Number: 22
  • Atomic Weight: 47.867
  • Classification: Transition metal
  • Phase at Room Temperature: Solid
  • Density: 4.506 grams per cm cubed
  • Melting Point: 1668°C, 3034°F
  • Boiling Point: 3287°C, 5949°F
  • Discovered by: William Gregor in 1791. First pure titanium produced by M. A. Hunter in 1910.
Titanium is the first element in the fourth column of the periodic table. It is classified as a transition metal. Titanium atoms have 22 electrons and 22 protons.

Characteristics and Properties

Under standard conditions titanium is a hard, light, silvery metal. At room temperature it can be brittle, but it becomes more malleable at higher temperatures.

One of titanium's most valuable qualities is its high strength-to-weight ratio. This means it is both very strong, but also very light. It is twice as strong as aluminum, but only weighs 60% more. It is also as strong as steel, but weighs much less.

Titanium is fairly inactive and is very resistant to corrosion from other elements and substances like acids and oxygen. It has a relatively low electrical and thermal conductivity.

Where is titanium found on Earth?

Titanium is not found as a pure element in nature, but is found in compounds as part of minerals in the Earth's crust. It is the ninth most abundant element in the Earth's crust. The most important minerals for mining titanium are rutile and ilmenite. The top producing countries of these ores are Australia, South Africa, and Canada.

How is titanium used today?

The majority of titanium is used in the form of titanium dioxide (TiO2). Titanium dioxide is a very white powder that has a number of industrial uses including white paint, paper, plastics, and cements.

Titanium is used to alloy with different metals such as iron, aluminum, and manganese where it helps to produce strong and lightweight alloys for use in spacecraft, naval ships, missiles, and as armor plating. Its resistance to corrosion makes it especially useful in sea water applications.

Another valuable characteristic of titanium is that it is biocompatible. This means that it will not be rejected by the human body. This quality, coupled with its strength, durability, and light weight, make titanium an excellent material for medical use. It is used in various applications such as hip replacements and dental implants. Titanium is also used in jewelry to make rings and watches.

How was it discovered?

Titanium was first recognized as a new element by Reverend William Gregor in 1791. The English clergyman enjoyed studying minerals as a hobby. He named the element menachanite. The name was later changed to titanium by German chemist M.H. Kalproth. The first pure titanium was produced by American chemist M. A. Hunter in 1910.

Where did titanium get its name?

Titanium gets its names from the Titans who were Greek gods.

Isotopes

Titanium has five stable isotopes including titanium-46, 47, 48, 49, and 50. The majority of titanium found in nature is in the form of the isotope titanium-48.

Interesting Facts about Titanium

More on the Elements and the Periodic Table

Elements
Periodic Table

Alkali Metals
Lithium
Sodium
Potassium

Alkaline Earth Metals
Beryllium
Magnesium
Calcium
Radium

Transition Metals
Scandium
Titanium
Vanadium
Chromium
Manganese
Iron
Cobalt
Nickel
Copper
Zinc
Silver
Platinum
Gold
Mercury
Post-transition Metals
Aluminum
Gallium
Tin
Lead

Metalloids
Boron
Silicon
Germanium
Arsenic

Nonmetals
Hydrogen
Carbon
Nitrogen
Oxygen
Phosphorus
Sulfur
Halogens
Fluorine
Chlorine
Iodine

Noble Gases
Helium
Neon
Argon

Lanthanides and Actinides
Uranium
Plutonium

More Chemistry Subjects

Matter
Atom
Molecules
Isotopes
Solids, Liquids, Gases
Melting and Boiling
Chemical Bonding
Chemical Reactions
Radioactivity and Radiation
Mixtures and Compounds
Naming Compounds
Mixtures
Separating Mixtures
Solutions
Acids and Bases
Crystals
Metals
Salts and Soaps
Water
Other
Glossary and Terms
Chemistry Lab Equipment
Organic Chemistry
Famous Chemists


Science >> Chemistry for Kids >> Periodic Table







About Ducksters  Teachers Privacy Policy

Last updated: This site is a product of TSI (Technological Solutions, Inc.), Copyright 2014, All Rights Reserved. By using this site you agree to the Terms of Use.

To cite this article using MLA style citation: